The Argentine farmer found the shell of Glyptodon

Jose Antonio Nieves, a resident of Argentina, went for a walk to the farm… and found a historic discovery. His farm is located 25 km South from Buenos Aires, so it’s not the most remote and abandoned place.

Close to the river Jose found a huge black egg! He rushed home and told everyone that he found “dinosaur egg”.

At first it was difficult to determine how big is “the egg” because the finding was partially under the ground. When Jose finally released the “eggs” from land cover, it turned out that it was in truth incredible!

The discovery was so huge that could not belong to dinosaurs. It was the shell of Glyptodon – a family of armadillos that lived during the Ice age. More than 10 000 years ago all of South America was inhabited by these herbivores. The researchers say that this creature was the size of a “Volkswagen beetle”. The find is preserved in excellent condition.

This event occurred, which archaeologists call historic in 2015.

The shells Glyptodon differ on the same principle as the prints of human fingers. Armor protected Glyptodon from predators. This finding, not unusual for Brazil or Uruguay. Their tails were also armored.

The animals were so strong that it could penetrate the armor even of their relatives. The shell of Glyptodon consisted of approximately 1000 bone plates. They had strong legs, huge shoulders and fused it to the spine. Biologists say that between Glyptodont and modern turtle have nothing in common.

6_result-19

8_result-151

9_result-122

10_result-120

11_result-108

14_result-83

15_result-71

16_result-64

17_result-4

18_result-44

19_result-5

20_result-32

The shell, discovered josé, was severely damaged. Experts say that such a hole could be just another Glyptodon. most likely, it was still quite young. The cause of death for this Glyptodon could become a bitter battle with a representative of its kind.

Glyptodon became extinct at the end of the Ice age, about 10,000 years ago. It’s safe to say that this discovery is of great value to biologists, historians and archaeologists!

You may also like...