An area responsible for distinguishing tastes of food has been found in the brain.

How exactly does the brain recognize the differences between the five basic tastes — sweet, salty, bitter, sour, and umami? Scientists finally managed to find in the brain the area responsible for this important process.

New researchers fetish – is the cortex of the insular lobe of the brain. She is already credited with responsibility for many of the most important processes, from control over the motor apparatus to social empathy. Now one more item can be added to this list – taste identification. A new study clarifies the role that the bark of the island plays in deciphering the taste signals.

Adam Anderson and his team from Cornell University in New York armed themselves with detailed MRI scans of the brain of 20 adults and statistics, resulting in a very detailed model. She helped to separate the reaction in taste from others associated with it – for example, the disgust that a person instinctively feels when eating very sour or bitter foods. Part of the problem is that when we eat something, many neurons are in an active state, which creates a “noise” that makes it difficult to get accurate data. Fortunately, now a significant percentage of this noise could be separated from the desired signals.

Scientists were able to identify the so-called “sweet spot” – a part of the brain that became active every time a person tried sugary foods. However, its location was different for different people: it happened that the same brain area in two subjects was responsible for a different taste perception. But now the old myth has been debunked, and if earlier scientists believed that the receptors of the tongue were mainly responsible for the perception of taste, now they have found out that the brain still plays a priority role in this process. Let the language and is a kind of chemical analyzer, the interpretation and distribution of signals ultimately occurs in the brain.