In the South China Sea, corals are massively killed

Scientists warn of another case of mass death of corals, caused by rising sea temperatures. According to experts, 40% of the corals in the area of ​​the Dong Sha atoll in the South China Sea have disappeared. Nothing like this has been seen in the region for at least 40 years.

Anne Cohen, an employee of the Woodson Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts, explains that the El Niño phenomenon of 2015/2016 was devastating for corals around the world, including the reef in the Dong Sha atoll area. There the corals were discolored and died. The temperature of the water rose in the region by an average of 2 degrees – it’s not so much and is unable to destroy the corals, but the El Niño phenomenon further “warmed up” the environment, and the total excess was about 6 degrees. This experience is already difficult.

Observing this area has allowed scientists to conclude that the speed at which corals die will not stop the process unless the most determined measures are taken to “cool” the temperature of the Earth and water,

The most famous coral reef in the world – the Great Barrier Reef – is experiencing the same problems: the discoloration of its corals has become news of the media for more than a year. Scientists warn of another case of mass mortality of corals caused by rising sea temperatures. According to experts, 40% of the corals in the area of ​​the Dong Sha atoll in the South China Sea have disappeared. Nothing like this has been seen in the region for at least 40 years.

Anne Cohen, an employee of the Woodson Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts, explains that the El Niño phenomenon of 2015/2016 was devastating for corals around the world, including the reef in the Dong Sha atoll area. There the corals were discolored and died. The temperature of the water rose in the region by an average of 2 degrees – it’s not so much and is unable to destroy the corals, but the El Niño phenomenon further “warmed up” the environment, and the total excess was about 6 degrees. This experience is already difficult.

Observing this area has allowed scientists to conclude that the speed at which corals die will not stop the process unless the most determined measures are taken to “cool” the temperature of the Earth and water.

The most famous coral reef in the world – the Great Barrier Reef – is experiencing the same problems: the discoloration of its corals has become news of the media for several years in a row.