From a board of the ISS the unknown source of positrons is found

The team of researchers famous as Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Collaboration, found earlier unknown source of the positrons going towards Earth. In the new work researchers submit the report on the cosmic rays registered by means of the AMS tool located onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and also explain why some of these registered events can’t be entirely charged to the cosmic rays facing atoms of gases in space.

In case of registration of cosmic rays the great value is related numbers of the secondary particles formed as a result of collisions of primary particles of cosmic rays with atoms of gases to number of primary particles. It is considered that primary cosmic rays are formed as a result of explosions of supernew or other high-energy space events. The relation described above carries the name B/C, and high value of this relation specifies, for example, passing of primary cosmic rays through a thick gas layer with formation of considerable number of secondary particles.

These new data obtained by means of the AMS tool are of special value for scientists as before installation of this tool they had to rely on the sensors established on high-rise aerostats which gave an error to 15 percent. Having the new data obtained by means of the AMS tool, the team could see that the relation of B/C is pro rata to energy of a nucleon in degree-1/3 that Andrey Kolmogorov, the outstanding Soviet mathematician, predicted in 1941.

However these data conflict to other theories trying to explain the unusual results of observations showing the increased quantities of the positrons bombarding Earth in relation to high-speed electrons. The data obtained through AMS in fact exclude a possibility of reference of these results into the account of primary or secondary cosmic rays, specifying that these particles go to Earth from unknown space sources which can be dark matter or pulsars.

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