Ninth planet in our system could attract the Sun

According to new research assumptions and hypothetical (it has not been seen, but all believe that it is, if it is brief) the Ninth planet, located far beyond the orbit of Pluto can be a “rogue planet”, which was caught and pulled our Solar system in the past.

“It is likely that the Ninth planet is a traveling planet the world, is not tied to any particular star, traveling through space,” said the study’s lead author James Vesper, the undergraduate student of the University of new Mexico (NMSU), speaking at 229 meeting of the American astronomical community.

Vesper and his mentor Paul Mason, Professor of mathematics and physics NMSU, conducted a computer simulation 156 scenarios, taking into account the different size and trajectories under which a planet can move closer to our Solar system. It should be noted that this approach may not be extremely rare in the Universe. Some studies indicate that wandering the planet in their number may even exceed the “normal” worlds orbiting their stars in the milky way.

Conducted computer simulations showed that about 60 percent of cases encounters a rogue planet could have a certain effect on the Solar system. In most cases we are talking about the usual “in and out”, but in 10 percent of all possible cases, the planet would be able to bring at least one of our own planets.

Approximately 40 percent of cases of rapprochement, according to computer models, a rogue planet would be captured by the gravity of the Solar system. This capture could be “soft”: in this case, no native planets of the Solar system would be thrown outside. Or “hard”: one or more home planets in this case would be driven out of the system.

“Everything would depend on the characteristics of the wandering planet,” explained Vesper.

Simulations also indicate that our Solar system, most likely never crossed paths with the wandering planets a lot more of Neptune. Otherwise the planet is of similar size though, and stirred up the entire inner Solar system, but nevertheless it remained sealed until today.

According to the latest assumptions, the Ninth planet may be 10 times more massive than Earth. For comparison, the same mass of Neptune is 17 times larger than the earth. The existence of this “imperceptible to the eye” of the world were first announced in October 2014, astronomers Scott Sheppard of the Carnegie institution (USA) and Chadwick Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory Hawaii. Sheppard and Trujillo noted the presence of the gravitational distortion, acting on some Kuiper belt objects, such as dwarf planet Sedna.

According to new research assumptions and hypothetical (it has not been seen, but all believe that it is, if it is brief) the Ninth planet, located far beyond the orbit of Pluto can be a “rogue planet”, which was caught and pulled our Solar system in the past.
“It is likely that the Ninth planet is a traveling planet the world, is not tied to any particular star, traveling through space,” said the study’s lead author James Vesper, the undergraduate student of the University of new Mexico (NMSU), speaking at 229 meeting of the American astronomical community.

Vesper and his mentor Paul Mason, Professor of mathematics and physics NMSU, conducted a computer simulation 156 scenarios, taking into account the different size and trajectories under which a planet can move closer to our Solar system. It should be noted that this approach may not be extremely rare in the Universe. Some studies indicate that wandering the planet in their number may even exceed the “normal” worlds orbiting their stars in the milky way.

Conducted computer simulations showed that about 60 percent of cases encounters a rogue planet could have a certain effect on the Solar system. In most cases we are talking about the usual “in and out”, but in 10 percent of all possible cases, the planet would be able to bring at least one of our own planets.

Approximately 40 percent of cases of rapprochement, according to computer models, a rogue planet would be captured by the gravity of the Solar system. This capture could be “soft”: in this case, no native planets of the Solar system would be thrown outside. Or “hard”: one or more home planets in this case would be driven out of the system.

“Everything would depend on the characteristics of the wandering planet,” explained Vesper.

Simulations also indicate that our Solar system, most likely never crossed paths with the wandering planets a lot more of Neptune. Otherwise the planet is of similar size though, and stirred up the entire inner Solar system, but nevertheless it remained sealed until today.

According to the latest assumptions, the Ninth planet may be 10 times more massive than Earth. For comparison, the same mass of Neptune is 17 times larger than the earth. The existence of this “imperceptible to the eye” of the world were first announced in October 2014, astronomers Scott Sheppard of the Carnegie institution (USA) and Chadwick Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory Hawaii. Sheppard and Trujillo noted the presence of the gravitational distortion, acting on some Kuiper belt objects, such as dwarf planet Sedna.