The fog M78 in the constellation of Orion

The reflective fog M78 is from us at distance of 1600 light years in the constellation of Orion. At observations in visible light she looks as the bright blue cloud surrounded with dark dust strips. Dust reflects and scatters light radiated by young stars in M78 kernel. As a matter of fact, therefore a fog also call reflective.

Fortunately, the astronomy has gone beyond visible light long ago. Observations in IR spectrum allow to get for a dust veil and to see the bright stars hidden inside. For example, two sverkhigigant of HD 38563A and HD 38563B which, as a matter of fact, also highlight a fog.

This richly detailed view of the star formation region Messier 78, in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter), was taken with the VISTA infrared survey telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile. As well as the blue regions of reflected light from the hot young stars the image also shows streams of dark dust and the red jets emerging from stars in the process of formation.

This richly detailed view of the star formation region Messier 78, in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter), was taken with the VISTA infrared survey telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile. As well as the blue regions of reflected light from the hot young stars the image also shows streams of dark dust and the red jets emerging from stars in the process of formation.

 

It is possible to consider also a supergiant of HD 290861 in next the fog NGC 2071. The IR spectrum also allows us to see the mass of the stars which are formed in clouds of dust. In a picture they are well noticeable in the reddish and yellow color. Some of them are stars of type T of the Taurus. So call young stars which temperature in a kernel is still insufficient to start thermonuclear reaction. They emit energy due to gravitational compression.

These comparison cutouts show how differently parts of this rich star-forming complex in Orion appear at different wavelengths. In the infrared images from the VISTA telescope (lower row) the dust is much more transparent than in the visible light pictures from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope (upper row).

These comparison cutouts show how differently parts of this rich star-forming complex in Orion appear at different wavelengths. In the infrared images from the VISTA telescope (lower row) the dust is much more transparent than in the visible light pictures from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope (upper row).

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