The unconfirmed exosatellite of the Earth is uncharacteristic of the solar system

René Heller, a scientist from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Germany, presented a new paper describing the possible properties of the yet unconfirmed satellite of our planet, Kepler 1625 b-i. The researcher shows that in the event that this exosatellite does exist, it is likely to be unlike any of the satellites of the planets of the solar system, and this can lead to an expansion of the list of theories of the origin of the satellites of the planets.

In July of this year, a team of researchers led by Alex Teachey and David Kipping from Columbia University, USA, announced the discovery of possible evidence that another satellite is being circled around our planet outside the solar system.

In his work, Heller describes his analysis of data on this hypothetical exosatellite, obtained with the help of the Kepler space telescope (Kepler). The scientist notes that the available data is insufficient to determine the size of this satellite of our planet, which can range from the size of the Earth to the size of Saturn. He also notes that these data do not prove the existence of an exoptant from the Earth, but at the same time makes a bold assumption about its possible size – indicating that it can be approximately equal to the size of Neptune.

In the solar system, of course, the satellites of the planets are not so large. This indicates that the main theories of the origin of the satellites of the planets are the “collision hypothesis”; Assimilation of material circulating around the planet; the capture of an external object by the planet’s gravity – can not explain its appearance in orbit around our planet. Consequently, if the existence of this exosatellite of the Earth is confirmed, this will entail an expansion of the list of theories of the origin of the satellites of the planets, Heller believes.