The 17th century hotel protected guests from witches

During excavations in Sutherland County, researchers from the GUARD Archeology team discovered the remains of an old inn.

With a thriving hotel 300 years ago, a tavern worked where guests rested from a difficult journey through the rough terrain of Scotland. Among the public, according to archaeologists from Glasgow (Scotland), there were mostly traders carrying cattle to the market, and nomadic wanderers.

Among other rarities, researchers unearthed broken glasses and coins. They also found a place where the focus was supposedly located. The stones laid out in a certain way testified to his whereabouts.

Interestingly, among the stones, archaeologists found an inverted cross. According to researchers, it was intended to scare away witches who had the habit of flying into a tavern through a chimney.

Archaeologists have suggested that an inn with a tavern was in demand throughout the 17th century. This was explained by the proximity of the road along which travelers and traders usually traveled.

Traveling travelers, according to researchers, quickly replenished the amount spent by the owners on a solid construction.

However, already in the next century gloomy times came for the hotel. The road was moved up the hill. The inn was out of work.

And in the XIX century they decided to lay a railway through Highland. And the inn was demolished from the face of the earth.

The GUARD Archaeology team has published a report on this exciting work on its official website.