A new species of slime mold found in Altai may be the key to combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria

An expedition to the Ribbon Bora led to the discovery of fungus-like protists containing more than 100 biologically active substances with antibacterial activity. The new species, named Stemonitis amphorocolumella, differs from previously known species in morphological features and has an upwardly extending column in the shape of an ancient Greek amphora. The discovery may contribute to the development of new drugs against resistant bacteria.

Slime molds are fungus-like protists that live in soil, leaf litter, dead wood and the bark of living trees. They feed on bacteria and yeast and play an important role in regulating the decomposition of organic matter. In addition, slime worms have a significant influence on bacteria and yeast populations and also serve as food for a variety of insects.

Recently, biologists from the Altai region discovered a new species of slime molds that may be the key to combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Expedition to the Ribbon Bora led to the discovery of fungus-like protists containing more than 100 biologically active substances with antibacterial activity. The new species, named Stemonitis amphorocolumella, differs from the previously known species in morphological features and has an upwardly extending column in the form of an ancient Greek amphora.

The discovery of the new slime mold species could be a breakthrough in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Many of the more than 100 bioactive substances contained in myxomycetes exhibit high antibacterial activity, including against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. This opens up the possibility of developing new drugs that will be effective against resistant bacteria.

A new slime mold species was described by Anastasia Vlasenko and Vyacheslav Vlasenko from the Laboratory of Mycology, Algology, and Lichenology of the Central Siberian Botanical Garden of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences together with a colleague from abroad. Molecular genetic studies confirmed that the identified species is new to science.

The discovery of the new slime mold species is an important step in understanding the biological diversity of our planet. In addition, it opens up new perspectives in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which are becoming increasingly common and dangerous to human health.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x