Scientists have proven that humans are still evolving

Humans are still evolving, according to experts at the University of Adelaide. Another proof of this was an additional artery in the forearm, the number of people with which in just a century and a half increased from 10% to 35%. The study was published in the Journal of Anatomy.

At birth in humans, the middle artery is located in the forearm – it plays an important role in the circulatory system of the embryo. For most, it disappears eight weeks after birth, and two new ones form in its place. However, if in the 1880s it was preserved in addition to new arteries in about 10% of the population, then by the twentieth century it was already found in 30%. Today, the middle artery can be found in 35% of people.

Such changes could occur as a result of mutations in genes involved in the development of the middle artery or due to changes in the health status of mothers, or, perhaps, for several reasons at the same time. One way or another, scientists predict that the middle artery will remain in most people by 2100.

On the one hand, an accessory artery increases the risk of developing tunnel syndrome, the researchers note. On the other hand, it can provide blood supply to the hand if other vessels are damaged. It can also be used in surgeries requiring vascular transplants. People are still evolving, according to the University of Adelaide. Another proof of this was an additional artery in the forearm, the number of people with which in just a century and a half increased from 10% to 35%. The study was published in the Journal of Anatomy.

At birth in humans, the middle artery is located in the forearm – it plays an important role in the circulatory system of the embryo. For most, it disappears eight weeks after birth, and two new ones form in its place. However, if in the 1880s it was preserved in addition to new arteries in about 10% of the population, then by the twentieth century it was already found in 30%. Today, the middle artery can be found in 35% of people.

Such changes could occur as a result of mutations in genes involved in the development of the middle artery or due to changes in the health status of mothers, or, perhaps, for several reasons at the same time. One way or another, scientists predict that the middle artery will remain in most people by 2100.

On the one hand, an accessory artery increases the risk of developing tunnel syndrome, the researchers note. On the other hand, it can provide blood supply to the hand if other vessels are damaged. In addition, it can be used in operations requiring vascular transplants.

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